Cloud computing is mainstream. That’s a fact. Chances are if your company isn’t already extensively using the cloud, it is planning on doing so in the very near future.

But be careful…there are many mistakes that companies new to the cloud make when they begin looking into cloud adoption. In this series of articles, I’ll look at the top three mistakes people make when adopting the cloud.

Mistake #1: The Cloud Isn’t Secure

One of the biggest misconceptions that companies new to the cloud deal with is trust. Can you trust the cloud?

This can show up many ways, but a common way is in how a company deals with cloud security.

Security is very important to nearly all companies. Moving to the public cloud means taking my application that is safely behind your company’s firewall, and putting it on a publicly accessible cloud service.

This requires trust. Can I trust the cloud to keep my application and my data secure?

The answer: yes, you can.

In the vast majority of cases, your company’s applications are probably safer in the hands of a public cloud provider than they are in your own private data centers.

Why is that true? Because public cloud service providers make a living on trust. They would not be in business if they could not keep their customer’s data secure.

They invest heavily in building high-quality security teams that spend their time advancing the state of the art in security protocols and procedures.

By putting your data in the hands of a reputable public cloud provider, you take advantage of the learnings and best practices created by the leaders in the security field. Unless your company has the same resources to invest in security as the cloud providers do, your company can benefit from these learnings in so many ways.

By using a public cloud provider and taking advantage of all the security offerings they provide, you can actually keep your applications and data safer in the public cloud than you can behind your own firewall.

In the next article, I’ll talk about the second mistake people make during a cloud migration – believing that Lift-n-Shift is a cloud migration.